dark web news

Uber Lands in the Hot Seat

Uber’s Concealment of Hack Set for Trial.

Uber is set to dominate the dark web hacking news of 2022. The company that offers ride sharing services will be thrust in the spotlight for the 2016 dark web cyber attack. This involves the 57 million stolen private information for its ride share clients and drivers in 2016.

It was recently reported that the disguise of the criminal hack by an Uber executive will go on trial shortly.

Prosecutors recently hit the previous security head of Uber with additional charges for his role in the concealment of the hacking crime, which could expose millions to fraud from their stolen identity.

The recently documented charge adds to an already growing list of criminal charges. The forthcoming arraignment of the previous security boss could have massive consequences on the Uber brand. Cyber security analysts theorized that the company could be in for some turbulent troubles in 2022. Uber could be the unwilling recipient of a class action lawsuit involving the 57 million clients whose information was inadvertently made available to criminal hackers.

Joseph Sullivan, the former security chief, presently has wire fraud added to his mounting legal troubles. This new charge adds to the generally extensive rundown of charges already filed against him. In addition, he has been slapped with previous indictments by the federal grand jury for obstruction of justice and ‘misprision of a felony.

The former Uber top guy supposedly had disguised the criminal hack that includes Uber’s 600,000 drivers. Likewise, 57 million clients that utilized the ride sharing organization, who had their private data compromised by dark web hackers.

Uber 2016 Breach Affects 57 Million Riders

The story unfurls in October 2016 when two dark web hackers inadvertently gain private information on Uber’s client base. With that massive hack, credit cards, addresses, names, telephone numbers, and other sensitive information of 57 million Uber riders were compromised by the criminal hack.

In addition, Uber’s private drive force of 600,000 drivers had their vehicle and driving information compromised as well.

Uber’s hacking debacle began when one of its engineers posted some of the website’s private certification on a code sharing online portal. With free admittance to the priviledge information, it incidentally turned into the objective of dark web criminals.

What makes matter most noticeably terrible for Uber and its millions of customers, the company did not report the hack to law authorities. Instead, the beleaguered former security chief concealed the hack and paid the demanded ransom. For a measly payout of US $100,000.00 in Bitcoins, the hackers were paid to destroy the private information in their possession.

In a strange twist of faith, the two dark web hackers were identified by law enforcement officials. They have since been indicted and convicted for cyber hacks involving LinkedIn and Uber in 2016.

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