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Dark Web Hackers CoinDesk Link?

Hackers Steal Classified Cryptocurrency Info

CoinDesk has found itself in the crosshair of dark web hackers, which were linked to a recent exploitation on the cryptocurrency news portal.

The company’s IT technicians revealed they recently discovered a vulnerability in its CMS (content management system). Investigators believe that this recent exploit might have provided dark web hackers access to their system, which contains multiple, soon-to-be-published, articles.

According to the most recent update by the news site, the incident most likely involved dark web hackers, none of which have been identified, to catch a glimpse at the unpublished headlines. As a direct result of this incident, the dark web hackers may have taken advantage of crypto insider trading.

CoinDesk’s official report also states that their cyber security team confirmed the deep web hacking activity in the CMS leak last week. The dark web hackers responsible for the crime may have reaped countless benefits from it, as they were able to access classified crypto trading information before the official publication of an article.

As of press time, Kevin Worth, CoinDesk’s chief content officer, stated in the most recent report that the problem has been resolved, and CoinDesk has “added safeguards” against dark web attacks within its system.

Twitter Users Blast CoinDesk Over Hack

However, not everyone has handled the CMS hack with as much calm as CoinDesk. Although numerous reports state that the leak only allowed the dark web hackers to view the drafts of the articles, there’s a much deeper issue that left most Twitter users enraged.

Most users agree that the dark web hacking attack only happened because of a simple programming error, which is linked to the fault of the developers.

The issue most people have is what the dark web hackers can do once they slip past a single gap of a system’s defense. Dark web hackers are cunning and prolific at hacking any computer network system. They are known to gain access to the system through the API (application programming interface), and easily modify the system once inside.

Furthermore, the same report noted that when the API receives a faulty request, it will return a lengthy error message or an error stack. As a result, the error stack opens the door for dark web hacks on CoinDesk’s backend publishing system.

With this freely available access, dark web hackers could modify unpublished articles. In addition, deep web hackers could create fake drafts that could cause havoc on the cryptocurrency market. Above all, dark web hackers could get first-hand knowledge of unreleased trading information. The sky would be the limit with millions if not billions of dollars earned by the dark web hackers responsible for the CoinDesk hack.

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